perlockholmes:

dorkkybatch:

Sherlock’s full body shots in The Empty Hearse.

Things to be thankful for

mycockholmess:

Sherlock + whoever you ship Sherlock with, this episode probably tried to give it to you

image

shinyrobutts:

THIS WAS THE SMOOTHEST SHIT I HAVE EVER SEEN

lucrezialoveshercesare:

It’s like Hufflepuffs united

telling your watson you’re alive

forsciencejohn:

expectation:

reality:

finalproblem:

Lazarus solution oddity: THIS IS WHERE I HAVE A HARD TIME STAYING NEUTRAL
Sherlock:

Speed was paramount. The airbag needed to be got out of the way just as John cleared the station. But we needed him to see a body.

SHERLOCK. WHAT ARE YOU DOING, SHERLOCK? YOU’RE NOT EVEN HELPING TO CARRY THE AIRBAG. YOU ARE JUST TURNING YOUR COAT COLLAR UP SO YOU LOOK COOL.
YOU DON’T NEED TO THROW A CORPSE OUT OF A WINDOW FOR JOHN TO SEE A BODY THAT LOOKS LIKE YOURS, SHERLOCK. YOU KNOW WHOSE BODY LOOKS A WHOLE LOT LIKE YOURS, SHERLOCK? YOUR BODY. YOUR BODY LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE YOURS.
JUST
LIE
DOWN
ON
THE
DAMN
SIDEWALK.
Ahem.
All right, so the real truth is that even though I am trying to protect myself from being disappointed, this right here? This is SO IRRATIONAL that, yes, I want Lazarus to be fake if I am honest. There are other reasons, too, and I’ll get to them. But this is the worst because how could you even write this scene and think this needed to happen? Not to mention three writers collaborating on the idea and ending up with this? It’s nonsense.
EVERYBODY TELLS ME NOT TO TRUST YOU, MOFFTISSON, BUT I AM GOING TO CHOOSE TO TRUST YOU. PLEASE DON’T LET ME DOWN.
———
(disclaimer)

finalproblem:

Lazarus solution oddity: THIS IS WHERE I HAVE A HARD TIME STAYING NEUTRAL

Sherlock:

Speed was paramount. The airbag needed to be got out of the way just as John cleared the station. But we needed him to see a body.

SHERLOCK. WHAT ARE YOU DOING, SHERLOCK? YOU’RE NOT EVEN HELPING TO CARRY THE AIRBAG. YOU ARE JUST TURNING YOUR COAT COLLAR UP SO YOU LOOK COOL.

YOU DON’T NEED TO THROW A CORPSE OUT OF A WINDOW FOR JOHN TO SEE A BODY THAT LOOKS LIKE YOURS, SHERLOCK. YOU KNOW WHOSE BODY LOOKS A WHOLE LOT LIKE YOURS, SHERLOCK? YOUR BODY. YOUR BODY LOOKS EXACTLY LIKE YOURS.

JUST

LIE

DOWN

ON

THE

DAMN

SIDEWALK.

Ahem.

All right, so the real truth is that even though I am trying to protect myself from being disappointed, this right here? This is SO IRRATIONAL that, yes, I want Lazarus to be fake if I am honest. There are other reasons, too, and I’ll get to them. But this is the worst because how could you even write this scene and think this needed to happen? Not to mention three writers collaborating on the idea and ending up with this? It’s nonsense.

EVERYBODY TELLS ME NOT TO TRUST YOU, MOFFTISSON, BUT I AM GOING TO CHOOSE TO TRUST YOU. PLEASE DON’T LET ME DOWN.

———

(disclaimer)

not-enough-fandom:

quintobatchh:

forsciencejohn:

quintobatchh:

casual reminder that if you are a Sherlock fan Arthur Conan Doyle would HATE you and everything you stand for. 

image

“If in 100 years I am only known as the man who invented Sherlock Holmes then I will have considered my life a failure.” - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

the original Robert Pattinson

seducemymindyouidiot:

Bitchy Sherlock is my favorite Sherlock.

doctorlovesdonna:


Nope. Nopenopenope……… nope.

doctorlovesdonna:

Nope. Nopenopenope……… nope.

sharllot:

One roof in London

posted 6 months ago with 16 notes via sharllot
some-atoms:

johnfuckingwatson:


lady-r0salind:


johnfuckingwatson:


Sherlock was with the Serbians long enough that Mycroft felt that he needed to intervene, and had time to work through their ranks. How much of that took place before Sherlock was captured and interrogated? We can’t be sure, but look at what we can see.
When Sherlock is running from his captors, they are well-prepared—night vision, assault weapons, multiple men on his trail, helicopters. The man who beats him mentions that Sherlock “broke in”. If Sherlock knew that the Serbians had this much power at their disposal, why was he careless with the break in? He’s already looking bedraggled when he runs from them, and when they have him surrounded, he sags with defeat. Have we ever seen Sherlock face an enemy with anything other than defiance before? It makes me wonder how much he may have been broken in by them at this point—whether his run for freedom came directly after the break in or was an escape attempt after being captured the first time.
Sherlock’s back is gouged. A great deal of it looks fresh. Some of it looks as though the blood has dried. At this point the detail is not so great that we can discern possible scarring, so how long he’s been beaten or whether it’s happened before is up to us to decide. What we do know is that he has enough beard growth to suggest that it’s been some time since he was able to shave (and we know that Sherlock prefers to be clean-shaven) and his hair has had time to become significantly dirty and matted.
However long Sherlock was at the hands of the Serbians, we do know that he was gone for two years (more than, considering that his “death” was June 15, 2011 and his return is days before November 5, 2013) and that Moriarty’s network was vast. This can’t be the first time that Sherlock has run into trouble as he was dismantling it. It’s possible that he’s been captured before and was able to get himself out of trouble—after all, he seems very confident that he could have managed this situation without Mycroft’s help.
So is it any wonder that he’s not exactly the Sherlock that we saw two years ago when he returns? He’s emotionally unstable, and that is why so much of his behavior in this episode seems strange. He’s seen and experienced terrible things while gone from London, and all that he knows upon his return is that he needs John by his side again, and that he’s willing to do anything to make sure that it happens. Sherlock can recognize now that he is lonely, that he depends so heavily on John. The conversation that he has with Mycroft about loneliness is obviously a reflection of the one about sex in A Scandal in Belgravia, and just like Mycroft’s “How would you know?” carried the weight of experience, so does Sherlock’s.


“He’s emotionally unstable, and that is why so much of his behavior in this episode seems strange. He’s seen and experienced terrible things while gone from London, and all that he knows upon his return is that he needs John by his side again, and that he’s willing to do anything to make sure that it happens.”
This is a wonderful deduction, but I did not see this aspect of Sherlock in his interactions with John. I did not see a wounded, unbalanced man trying to reconnect with the most important man in his life. I saw a glib, smug, emotionally tone-deaf child laughing in the face of honest emotion.


Sherlock may know that he needs John, but that doesn’t mean that he’s become any better at expressing it. He has always been emotionally immature, but improving: think of Hounds, when he says “I don’t have friends!” then attempts to smooth things over with John by parroting back the same compliments that John gives to him. Sherlock wears haughtiness like a shield. Even with John, especially now that they’ve been apart for so long, he has trouble being emotionally honest.
The only reason that I can think of to explain (not excuse, but explain) Sherlock’s fairly abhorrent behavior towards John in this episode is that he does not know how to handle making things right with him. So he pulls up that armor of swagger and sociopathy that he often uses when he is vulnerable, and engineers a situation in which he thinks that he can force himself and John to be honest with each other. And then to cover it up, he turns it into an elaborate joke.
But I think that what was said in that train scene (now that I’ve had a chance to think about it some more) was very honest, from both of them. And for better or worse, John recognizes it too, and he accepts it.


I HAVE MISSED CHARACTER ANALYSIS SO MUCH, THIS IS FANTASTIC. 

some-atoms:

johnfuckingwatson:

lady-r0salind:

johnfuckingwatson:

Sherlock was with the Serbians long enough that Mycroft felt that he needed to intervene, and had time to work through their ranks. How much of that took place before Sherlock was captured and interrogated? We can’t be sure, but look at what we can see.

When Sherlock is running from his captors, they are well-prepared—night vision, assault weapons, multiple men on his trail, helicopters. The man who beats him mentions that Sherlock “broke in”. If Sherlock knew that the Serbians had this much power at their disposal, why was he careless with the break in? He’s already looking bedraggled when he runs from them, and when they have him surrounded, he sags with defeat. Have we ever seen Sherlock face an enemy with anything other than defiance before? It makes me wonder how much he may have been broken in by them at this point—whether his run for freedom came directly after the break in or was an escape attempt after being captured the first time.

Sherlock’s back is gouged. A great deal of it looks fresh. Some of it looks as though the blood has dried. At this point the detail is not so great that we can discern possible scarring, so how long he’s been beaten or whether it’s happened before is up to us to decide. What we do know is that he has enough beard growth to suggest that it’s been some time since he was able to shave (and we know that Sherlock prefers to be clean-shaven) and his hair has had time to become significantly dirty and matted.

However long Sherlock was at the hands of the Serbians, we do know that he was gone for two years (more than, considering that his “death” was June 15, 2011 and his return is days before November 5, 2013) and that Moriarty’s network was vast. This can’t be the first time that Sherlock has run into trouble as he was dismantling it. It’s possible that he’s been captured before and was able to get himself out of trouble—after all, he seems very confident that he could have managed this situation without Mycroft’s help.

So is it any wonder that he’s not exactly the Sherlock that we saw two years ago when he returns? He’s emotionally unstable, and that is why so much of his behavior in this episode seems strange. He’s seen and experienced terrible things while gone from London, and all that he knows upon his return is that he needs John by his side again, and that he’s willing to do anything to make sure that it happens. Sherlock can recognize now that he is lonely, that he depends so heavily on John. The conversation that he has with Mycroft about loneliness is obviously a reflection of the one about sex in A Scandal in Belgravia, and just like Mycroft’s “How would you know?” carried the weight of experience, so does Sherlock’s.

He’s emotionally unstable, and that is why so much of his behavior in this episode seems strange. He’s seen and experienced terrible things while gone from London, and all that he knows upon his return is that he needs John by his side again, and that he’s willing to do anything to make sure that it happens.”

This is a wonderful deduction, but I did not see this aspect of Sherlock in his interactions with John. I did not see a wounded, unbalanced man trying to reconnect with the most important man in his life. I saw a glib, smug, emotionally tone-deaf child laughing in the face of honest emotion.

Sherlock may know that he needs John, but that doesn’t mean that he’s become any better at expressing it. He has always been emotionally immature, but improving: think of Hounds, when he says “I don’t have friends!” then attempts to smooth things over with John by parroting back the same compliments that John gives to him. Sherlock wears haughtiness like a shield. Even with John, especially now that they’ve been apart for so long, he has trouble being emotionally honest.

The only reason that I can think of to explain (not excuse, but explain) Sherlock’s fairly abhorrent behavior towards John in this episode is that he does not know how to handle making things right with him. So he pulls up that armor of swagger and sociopathy that he often uses when he is vulnerable, and engineers a situation in which he thinks that he can force himself and John to be honest with each other. And then to cover it up, he turns it into an elaborate joke.

But I think that what was said in that train scene (now that I’ve had a chance to think about it some more) was very honest, from both of them. And for better or worse, John recognizes it too, and he accepts it.

I HAVE MISSED CHARACTER ANALYSIS SO MUCH, THIS IS FANTASTIC. 

castielr:

(x)

blisterofthespotlight:

Sooooo, I watched Sherlock

credit